Cork Folklore Project aims to open a ‘tower of memory’

Cork Folklore Project aims to open a ‘tower of memory’

Fr John O’Donovan, North Cathedral; Tomás Mac Conmara, Cork Folklore Project; Lord Mayor Cllr Tony Fitzgerald, and Kieran Murphy, Cork Folklore Project, in the Cathedral bell tower. Picture: Denis Minihane

THE Cork Folklore Project has opened an outreach hub at the new North Cathedral Visitor’s Centre.

The group aims to turn it into an interactive hub, allowing people to engage with the memories and folklore they have collected over the last two decades.

Lord Mayor Tony Fitzgerald visited the centre to recognise the group’s work and talk about the plans for the future.

A view of Cathedral Road from a window in the bell tower in the North Cathedral, with inscriptions, some of which date back to the 19th century. Picture: Denis MinihaneThe manager of the project, Dr Tomás Mac Conmara, explained that the visit was focused on laying out the vision for the future development of the Cork Folklore

A view of Cathedral Road from a window in the bell tower in the North Cathedral, with inscriptions, some of which date back to the 19th century.	Picture: Denis Minihane
A view of Cathedral Road from a window in the bell tower in the North Cathedral, with inscriptions, some of which date back to the 19th century. Picture: Denis Minihane

The manager of the project, Dr Tomás Mac Conmara, explained that the visit was focused on laying out the vision for the future development of the Cork FolkloreA view of Shandon from a window in the bell tower in the North Cathedral, Cork. Picture: Denis Minihane.Project

“We were delighted to have the Lord Mayor visit us to hear more about our work. Councillor Fitzgerald has been very supportive of our organisation and this meeting had been planned for a number of months. We’ve been collecting folklore for over twenty years now and with the recent opening of an Outreach Hub, we are in a position to grow and develop. For this we need financial support. When we approached the Lord Mayor about our plans, he was more than supportive,” he said.

Mr Mac Conmara stressed that the project has delivered a vital cultural service for the people of Cork for over two decades.

“The people appreciate fully the value of what we do. What is needed now is more support to enable us to expand our collection and outreach programmes, which will have considerable impacts in areas of culture, tourism and education,” he said.

Kieran Murphy, researcher, Cork Folklore Project, looking at inscriptions on the walls in the bell tower in the North Cathedral some of which date back to the 19th century. Picture: Denis Minihane.
Kieran Murphy, researcher, Cork Folklore Project, looking at inscriptions on the walls in the bell tower in the North Cathedral some of which date back to the 19th century. Picture: Denis Minihane.

The Lord Mayor was taken to the 200-year-old bell tower, which the Project hopes to develop into a unique memory experience.

“One of our aims for development is the integration of our collected material into the visitor experience,” said researcher Kieran Murphy.

“A unique opportunity would be the development of a ‘Tower of Memory’ where visitors could be offered an audio-visual experience as they visit the bell. The key message we wanted to communicate to the Lord Mayor was the need for investment in the project,” he added.

Steps near the bell tower in the North Cathedral The bell tower is almost 200 years old is is being considered as a site for a ‘Tower of Memory’ visitor centre.	Picture: Denis Minihane
Steps near the bell tower in the North Cathedral The bell tower is almost 200 years old is is being considered as a site for a ‘Tower of Memory’ visitor centre. Picture: Denis Minihane

The Cork Folklore Project Outreach Hub can be visited from Monday to Friday at the North Cathedral Visitor Centre.

More in this section

Sponsored Content