Cork Muslims celebrate the end of Ramadan

Cork Muslims celebrate the end of Ramadan
Dr. Ferghal Radwan, Imam, who lead the prayers, with a group following an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.

CELEBRATIONS took place across Cork as the Rebel County’s Muslim communities marked the end of the Islamic period of Ramadan.

An Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.
An Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.

Ramadan started on May 16 and ended at sundown last Thursday.

The next day began with prayers and celebrations for Muslims across the world, marking the Eid al-Fitr, the day after Ramadan ends.

Zyan Nabhan Rahman at an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.
Zyan Nabhan Rahman at an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.

Eid al-Fitr in Arabic literally translates to “festival of breaking the fast.” At the Cork Islamic Information Centre in Shandon, Muslims gathered for morning prayers at around 8am.

Dr Fergal Radwan, who developed the centre in Shandon, said the community will rejoice after a month of fasting.

At prayer during an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.
At prayer during an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.

Meanwhile, there were early morning prayers at the Cork Mosque on Tramore Road at 7.30am, with prayers also at 9.30am.

Ramadan is observed by Muslims around the world as a month of fasting to commemorate “the best of times”, celebrating the first time the Koran was revealed to the prophet Muhammad, according to Islamic belief.

A group photographed at an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.
A group photographed at an Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan in the Islamic Information Centre, Shandon St. Picture: Denis Minihane.

During Ramadan, Muslims fast in the hours of daylight and break their fasts with a small meal called Iftar.

Muslims also refrain from smoking, sexual activity and jealousy during Ramadan.

The 2016 census showed that the number of Muslims in Ireland has increased by almost 30% since 2011.

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