Developer to take steps to minimise impact of construction work on residents of the area

Developer to take steps to minimise impact of construction work on residents of the area

A local man’s car covered in mud on Seminary Walk near Citidwell’s development on Redemption Road.

THE DEVELOPER behind an 80-home development in Farranferris has vowed to do everything it can to ensure the impact of construction traffic on residents is minimised following complaints.

Citidwell Homes is currently undertaking works on the grounds of St Finbarr’s Seminary on Redemption Road for the much-needed homes and three educational buildings.

Locals on Seminary Walk on Farranferris Avenue had complained that the movement of heavy construction traffic entering the area from Popham’s Road was leading to the depositing of dust on walls, windows and cars and causing damage to the road.

Residents on the street that spoke to The Echo said they were unable to open their windows or hang out washing due to the levels of dust.

Councillor Kenneth Collins surveying the road on Seminary Walk near Citidwell's development on Redemption Road.
Councillor Kenneth Collins surveying the road on Seminary Walk near Citidwell's development on Redemption Road.

However, Richard Galvin of Citidwell said measures are now in place to contain the spread of dust in the heavily populated area after he had visited homes on the street and heard people’s concerns.

All trucks have now been stopped entering the site until a wheel washing facility is installed and the developers have opened an account with a local car wash where the locals affected can have their cars washed for free.

A street sweeper machine is also on-site seven days a week in order to clean the road as soon as construction traffic passes through. It is understood planning conditions for the development include provisions related to dirt on the roads and the road will have to be resurfaced once construction is finished.

Councillor Kenneth Collins (SF), who lives in the area, said the development is welcomed but has urged Citidwell to keep lines of communication open with homeowners and households.

“This is a development that has been needed in the area for many years but I would have concerns about the impact on residents, the levels of construction traffic and the amount of dirt being left behind by these trucks. The road is quite narrow and there are lots of homes,” he said.

“Residents have contacted me and they are not happy. Some can’t open their windows and the road is under pressure.

“I would urge Citidwell to keep speaking to locals as construction continues. Everybody welcomes this development but disruption for locals has to be kept at a minimum” he added.

Ken O’Flynn (FF) has contacted City Hall about the matter.

“I’m hopeful that this developer will show respect for the local residents in the area,” he said.

Planning permission for a 90-home development on the site was originally granted in September 2011 but nothing had happened on the site for several years. The original permission included restoration, conservation and use of the protected structure of the former Farranferris Seminary Building, a creche and retail elements.

Almost 115 car parking spaces and a new entrance via Lovers Walk are also included.

An Bord Pleanála recently recommended the site be placed on the Vacant Sites Register after an appeal by Cork City Council.

The site was previously owned by the Cork Diocesan Trustees before Citidwell took it over and began work.

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