Councillor: Bollards on northside like something out of the Troubles

Councillor: Bollards on northside like something out of the Troubles

The concrete bollards were placed along the route as a temporary measure. Pic; Larry Cummins.

BOLLARDS installed on the Kilmore Road for over a decade have been likened to border control measures during the Troubles.

Local residents groups have called for the bollards, which line the road all the way from Kilmore Road to the Churchfield Industrial Estate, to be removed as they believe they are leading to a negative image of the area.

Cllr Thomas Gould: “They are absolutely horrible and they are bringing down the image of the whole of Kilmore Road." Pic: Larry Cummins.
Cllr Thomas Gould: “They are absolutely horrible and they are bringing down the image of the whole of Kilmore Road." Pic: Larry Cummins.

They have been described as similar to bollards used in the West Bank in Israeli army-controlled areas or on the border between Northern Ireland and the south during the height of the Troubles.

The concrete bollards were placed along the route as a temporary measure to prevent unofficial halting sites being established but were filled with concrete in recent years.

Councillor Thomas Gould said central Government funding is needed to remove them and repair the footpaths along the road.

“They are absolutely horrible and they are bringing down the image of the whole of Kilmore Road,” he told The Echo.

“They stretch all the way from the entrance at St Vincent’s field, all the way through Churchfield Industrial Estate and up to Castleview and Temple United’s soccer pitches.

“Kids can’t walk on the road. People can’t walk with buggies or those with disabilities can’t use the footpath.

“It’s pushing walkers out onto the road. This is crazy stuff. They need to be taken away. They were a temporary measure that was put in to stop people parking on the footpath but they were filled fill of concrete and now they are there permanently.

“In Mahon, they have a six-inch curb so people can’t park. They have done the same in Ballymun in Dublin and Moyross in Limerick.

“There are thousands of people coming into the area travelling to the likes of Apple computers for work on the Kilmore Road to avoid traffic in the city. The bollards give a terrible impression of the area.

“For the people who live in the area, it’s depressing to look at and this is not the environment we want for our children. They give a negative feeling to the community. Would these be left anywhere else other in Knocknaheeny? It’s not acceptable and these are a disgrace,” Mr Gould added.

The Department of Environment in Dublin has turned down two funding requests from Cork City Council to remove them and repair the footpath.

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