Counsellors in Ireland offer advice for those depressed after the clocks went back

Counsellors in Ireland offer advice for those depressed after the clocks went back

With the shorter days, counsellors advise people to take the time to get outside and catch what sunlight is available.

After the clocks went back at the weekend, counsellors in Ireland are offering advice for those who may suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder or S.A.D. 

The hour change means that longer nights and shorter days are upon us, until next Spring. 

Coupled with less sunlight and colder, wetter weather this can have a negative impact on people’s mental health.

This can often be diagnosed as Seasonal Affective Disorder or S.A.D. 

The Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (IACP) offers some advice on dealing with S.A.D. and coming to terms with it S.A.D presents itself as a form of depression that can result in low mood, irritability, loss of appetite, lack of interest (in pursuits once pleasurable), lack of concentration, insomnia, changes in weight and even suicide ideation.

Counsellor and Chair of the IACP Ray Henry said: “The lack of natural light can affect people’s outlook. Our members [counsellors/psychotherapists] often see clients who speak of oversleeping, low energy and withdrawing from their social circles”.

The IACP offers the following advice for those who feel they may suffer from S.A.D:

Talk to your GP to get advice on how to help handle the symptoms.

Talk to an IACP Member who is trained to help you.

Take the time to get outside - It’s very important to stay active during the winter months, and catch what available sunlight you can get.

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