Gardaí reveal the number of motorists fined for flouting the Patrick's Street car ban

Gardaí reveal the number of motorists fined for flouting the Patrick's Street car ban
Private cars are banned from Patrick's Street from 3pm to 6.30pm each dayPicture: Denis Minihane.

A total of 66 people have been hit with fines for flouting the private car ban on Patrick's Street so far this year.

Gardaí have confirmed that 66 fixed charge penalties were issued for violating the ban, which prohibits private cars from using the city's main street between 3pm and 6.30pm daily.

The motorists were issued with €160 fines.

There had been criticism of the lack of enforcement of the so-called Pana ban since it was introduced last year. 

This frustration led to a demonstration at the weekend, when members of the Extinction Rebellion (XR) climate change group took to Patrick's Street to direct traffic and enforce the ban.

The Pana ban was introduced, despite initial concerns from traders, to reduce car use in the city centre and improve public transport journey times. 

The car ban comes into affect from 3pm until 6.30pm each day.Credit: Damian Coleman
The car ban comes into affect from 3pm until 6.30pm each day.Credit: Damian Coleman

Meanwhile, in a further move to reduce car numbers in city, the Office of Public Works has confirmed that more than half of parking spaces on Morrison’s Island and Fr Mathew Quay will be lost as part of public realm works in the city’s flood defence project.

Up to 150 spaces will be removed to make way for pedestrian and cycleway routes.

Ken Leahy, of Lower Lee Flood Relief scheme project consultants ARUP, said it will reflect a move to more sustainable modes of transport.

Mr Leahy said: “The places where you have the most loss of spaces is probably on Morrison’s Quay, Fr Mathew Quay and Lapp’s Quay. The number lost is somewhere between 100 to 150 approximately,” he said.

“It’s more than half lost on Morrison's Quay and Fr Mathew Quay so it’s a significant change but very much keeping in the city’s requirements to move to more sustainable modes of transport like cycling and pedestrians and creating a better environment. 

"At the moment the area is not really used as a navigation route, it’s more of a car parking area.

“We will be changing the parking from perpendicular to either parallel or herringbone to maximise the space available for pedestrians and cyclists. 

"The shared space will typically be about four metres if we can achieve it but generally, there will be a philosophy of trying to create a better environment for pedestrians and cyclists by getting to that four metres. In some pinch points, we can’t and it is down to three metres,” Mr Leahy added.

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