Here's the timeline for flood relief projects all around Cork

Here's the timeline for flood relief projects all around Cork
The Glashaboy River in Glanmire, Co Cork.Pic; Larry Cummins

FLOOD defences in Glanmire/Sallybrook are unlikely to progress significantly over the next three years at least.

The Glashaboy River Flood Relief Scheme has been included on an extended timeline of works planned by the Office of Public Works (OPW) up to the year 2027. 

Meanwhile, the controversial Lower Lee scheme in Cork city is also on the long list.

There are 18 projects on the extended list, while just three projects across Cork city and county are expected to be completed by the end of 2022.

Flooding on Fr Mathew quay in Cork city last monthtPicture: Eddie O'Hare
Flooding on Fr Mathew quay in Cork city last monthtPicture: Eddie O'Hare

Flood defence projects in Clonakilty look set to be the next project completed. It’s due to be finished in Quarter 2 of 2020. The scheme in Bandon is also due to be delivered next year in Quarter 3.

Also at construction phase is the scheme in Douglas in Cork city, which is due to be completed by the end of 2022, according to a timeline released by the Minister of State for the Office of Public Works and Flood Relief Kevin ‘Boxer’ Moran, in response to a written question from Sinn Féin’s Pearse Doherty.

Nationally, €73.127m was spent on flooding projects and associated flood risk management measures and programmes for 2019. €90m has been allocated for 2020, with €100m allocated for each year up to and including 2027.

“This programme amounts to €1 billion approximately and includes over 150 individual flood relief projects which I and the Government are committed to implementing within the timeframe of the National Development Plan,” Minister Moran said.

“In addition to these projects the OPW will continue to fund Local Authorities to undertake eligible local flood relief projects up to a limit of €750,000 under the Minor Flood Mitigation Works and Coastal Protection Scheme,” he added.

Of the projects which are planned for the period up to 2027, 18 are in Cork. 

Each of the projects are being progressed at various times, with the Minister saying that at this point, it is not possible to identify the specific timeline to implementation for each individual project. 

This list includes the Glashaboy scheme, and the Lower Lee scheme - both of which have made headlines in recent weeks.

There is considerable opposition to the OPW’s plans for the Lower Lee Flood Relief Scheme, with the Save Cork City group’s John Hegarty writing in The Echo recently: “The tidal barrier is the only proposal that can stop the unsafe scenario of rising flood water at higher levels in the river than the ground floors of thousands of properties in the city.” 

A computer-generated image of what a tidal barrier in Cork Harbour would look like. It was commissioned by Save Cork City who are opposed to the flood defence proposal from the Office of Public Works and Cork city Council. Robert McNamara story
A computer-generated image of what a tidal barrier in Cork Harbour would look like. It was commissioned by Save Cork City who are opposed to the flood defence proposal from the Office of Public Works and Cork city Council. Robert McNamara story

Meanwhile, Labour councillor John Maher recently described the delay in the Glashaboy scheme as “bureaucratic nonsense”.

Others schemes in Cork city and county being advanced over the period to 2027 include: Ballingeary, Ballinhassig, Ballymakeera, Blackpool, Carrigaline, Castlemartyr, Castletown Bearhaven, Inchigeelagh, Inishannon, Kanturk, Macroom, Midleton, Rathcormack, Schull, and Youghal.

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