Threshold helped more than 2,700 people avoid homelessness in Cork last year

Threshold helped more than 2,700 people avoid homelessness in Cork last year

1,271 households, comprising of 1,725 adults and 979 children, availed of assistance from the Threshold Cork office and were able to keep their homes.

The Cork Threshold office has said that they have reached full capacity while anticipating increased numbers of clients in the coming year.

2,714 people were saved from homelessness by the Cork Tenancy Protection Service offered by Threshold in Cork in 2018, the housing agency said.

1,271 households, comprising of 1,725 adults and 979 children, availed of assistance from the Threshold Cork office and were able to keep their homes.

The household size ranged from 184 households who had one child each, to seven households with six children.

In Cork city, 1,227 people contacted Threshold for help and in the county, 1,146 people reached out.

Of the 2,609 new Threshold clients in 2018, 1,503 households (57%) were identified as being at imminent risk of homelessness.

There were 296 invalid termination notices and 283 notices issued where the landlord intended to sell within three months.

Sixty-two tenants were represented at the Residential Tenancy Board. In one of the cases where the landlord eventually complied, and the case was settled by Threshold, the landlord’s solicitor offered our client €10,000 compensation; this has been accepted by our client.

In another case, which was resolved by Threshold after contacting our client’s landlord, an offer of €1,500 was accepted by our client.

An agreement was also made during a WRC hearing which both the client and Threshold approved of, netted our client €3,400 in compensation.

While there were many positive outcomes, 90 people lost their home. Of these, 61 entered homeless services, 25 went to family and friends and four ended up in caravans or mobile homes.

Threshold said they had seen in the past months, a larger number of very vulnerable households returning for assistance with new “at-risk” issues with their tenancies which is not included in the reported figures.

“We only report on new unique cases who presented with a new issue during 2018. This increasing workload and the complexity of our cases mean that we are currently at full capacity.

“As this housing crisis continues, we at the TPS expect our client numbers to increase exponentially and we will require further resources to meet this demand.”

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