Safety concerns raised about new cycle path in Cork city

Safety concerns raised about new cycle path in Cork city
Lower Glanmire Road cycling Cork Cycling Campaign have expressed concerns over a cycle lane which comes to an end on the Lower Glanmire Road. Photo credit: Denis from Liberty Grill

Concerns have been raised about the safety of a new Cork City cycle path on Lower Glanmire Rd, leading onto Water St.

The cycle path ends on a corner, and cyclists say they will be forced to veer into oncoming traffic or cycle on the footpath because there is a traffic light in front of where the path ends.

However, Cork City Council says work is ongoing and all signage and cycle lane lining will be completed before Christmas.

Lower Glanmire Road cycling Cork Cycling Campaign have expressed concerns over a cycle lane which comes to an end on the Lower Glanmire Road. Photo credit: Denis from Liberty Grill
Lower Glanmire Road cycling Cork Cycling Campaign have expressed concerns over a cycle lane which comes to an end on the Lower Glanmire Road. Photo credit: Denis from Liberty Grill

Members of Cork Cycling Campaign, who are calling for more cycling infrastructure in the city, say this cycle lane is part of wider “serious safety concerns about the eastern approach to Cork City”.

Chris Williams, who is part of the campaign and who regularly cycles from Glanmire to UCC, says he has an issue with this development.

“What I presume is to be designated a cycle lane comes to an abrupt end as you get to the junction,” he said. “This is dangerous as it effectively forces the cyclist to rejoin what may be a fast-moving stream of traffic.

“[The intention may be] for cyclists to mount the pavement at this point and then cross the road by the pedestrian crossing, presumably then cycling on the pavement thereafter. I would have thought [that] to be a non-starter for most cyclists, as well as potentially endangering pedestrians.”

Brian Murphy, another member of Cork Cycling Campaign, is an engineer. He says the cycle lane presents issues for multiple road users.

“Segregation from motorists consists of a strip of paint,” he said. “Segregation from pedestrians is non-existent. The junction is illegible to end-users [cyclists], who are unsure how it should be used.

“The junction lacks coherence, as the route through the junction is not obvious. A delay has been purposefully built into the junction for cyclists, but not for main road traffic.

“Cyclists lose all priority, which isn’t appropriate for main cycle routes. [This] is one of the few designated ‘primary route’ arteries into the city, and the only city approach from the east that’s on flat ground.

“It should be of the highest priority for good cycle infrastructure design, it’s one of only two routes, along with Summer Hill North, where the city expects to receive cyclists from the east according to the Cork Cycle Network plan.

Lower Glanmire Road cycling The junction at Lower Glanmire Road and Water Street. Credit: Denis from Liberty Grill
Lower Glanmire Road cycling The junction at Lower Glanmire Road and Water Street. Credit: Denis from Liberty Grill

“Instead cyclists are being swept onto a footpath, putting them in direct conflict with pedestrians.”

Cork City Council’s Infrastructure Development Directorate said in response that “the construction of the Lower Glanmire Rd resurfacing and footpath renewal contract is ongoing”.

“The cycle lane lining, signage etc will be installed in the next two to three weeks, with all work scheduled to be substantially complete before Christmas.

“The phase one cycle lane terminates at the junction with Water St, whereby cyclists can safely turn onto Water St using the raised shared space platform, before joining the existing roadway.

“The final round of road safety audits will be undertaken early in the new year to ensure that any safety concerns are addressed.

“When complete, phase one of the project will provide approximately 1000m of new in-bound cycle lane along the Lower Glanmire Road.

“The project was funded by Transport Infrastructure Ireland. The work was designed and supervised by Cork City Council.”

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