'The crimes are becoming more gruesome and more shocking'; Expert warns that perpetrators of Cork attacks have no fear

'The crimes are becoming more gruesome and more shocking'; Expert warns that perpetrators of Cork attacks have no fear
Garda Forensic experts at the scene in Dunard, Mayfield, Cork.

AN advocate for victims of crime has warned that gruesome acts of violence are becoming commonplace in Cork.

In the last week in Cork city, a student was murdered, an elderly woman was injured during a joyriding incident, a man was assaulted with a hammer in Blackpool, another was attacked with a hurley, and today a father of three was beaten and set on fire.

Sally Hanlon, from Support After Crime Services on Anglesea Street, was reacting to the latest shocking crime, which left a young father in hospital with serious injuries after being doused in petrol and set alight at his home in Dunard Estate, Mayfield, this morning.

She said recent events have left her wondering when the gruesome crimes are going to end.

Garda Forensic experts at the scene in Dunard, Mayfield, Cork.
Garda Forensic experts at the scene in Dunard, Mayfield, Cork.

There have been six violent deaths in Cork since last July, including one where a man's head and arms were removed.

"Like most people in Cork, we are shocked at the horrific violence being perpetrated across the city," said Ms Hanlon.

"The crimes are becoming more gruesome and more shocking. 

"There is nothing sacred anymore. Perpetrators seem to have no fear. 

"I'm not sure if this comes down to drink or drugs, neither of which can serve as an excuse for these horrific crimes. 

"We have been around a long time. 

"However, the shock and horror of what one human being can do to another is devastating and has been shown to us so many times in the last number of months. It's hard to know when it is going to stop."

She made reference to the premeditated nature of many crimes today.

"It can take one punch, one blow, one stab wound. 

"Nonetheless, we have to wonder why people now feel it necessary to take weapons with them to a social occasion.

"I don't know how we can stop it. 

Garda members taking part in a search of the undergrowth on the cliff face above O’Donovan Rossa, Road, Cork in connection with the death of CIT student Cameron Blair who was stabbed at the Bandon Road, Cork. Picture Dan Linehan
Garda members taking part in a search of the undergrowth on the cliff face above O’Donovan Rossa, Road, Cork in connection with the death of CIT student Cameron Blair who was stabbed at the Bandon Road, Cork. Picture Dan Linehan

"I wish to God I did. I don't know if making the penalties harder would instill any fear in criminals. I don't know what it will take to instill a conscience in these people."

Ms Hanlon said that a crime can leave a number of victims in its wake.

"Our service is also available to witnesses of crime and those affected. 

"Sometimes, people feel like they have to be the main victims of the crime in order to seek help but there are so many other victims who are overlooked. 

"Many of these have to give statements and speak as witnesses in court. The long-lasting impact of crime often gets forgotten about. It has a rippling effect."

She expressed her condolences to families affected by crime over the last number of months.

Flowers left outside the house on the Bandon Road, Cork, where CIT student Cameron Blair was killed. Picture Dan Linehan
Flowers left outside the house on the Bandon Road, Cork, where CIT student Cameron Blair was killed. Picture Dan Linehan

"It is devastating for the families and we wish to express our condolences to those affected. We would like people to know that we are here and available to offer support."

To find out more about support after crime visit http://www.supportaftercrimeservices.ie/ or call 021 432 0555

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