'Core concerns have not been met': Criticism as planning granted for controversial Cork city apartment blocks

'Core concerns have not been met': Criticism as planning granted for controversial Cork city apartment blocks

Planning permission has been granted for 26 apartments in two blocks on the former site of the Glenanaar pub. 

INDEPENDENT councillor Kieran McCarthy has said that local residents’ concerns were not taken into account in relation to the apartment blocks due to be built on the former Glenanaar pub site on the Boreenmanna Rd.

Planning permission has been granted for 26 apartments in two blocks on the former site of the Glenanaar pub, despite a number of objections and a recommendation from An Bord Pleanála planners to refuse the application.

Mr McCarthy and Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin were among those who expressed concerns about the development, with a lack of parking and the height of the four-storey blocks among the reasons given.

Speaking to The Echo, Mr McCarthy said that while some minor amendments have been made, local residents have largely had their concerns ignored.

“Local residents and I were hoping for some amendments to the plans at An Bord Pleanála level, especially to the height of the apartment block,” he said.

“Local residents are not against the re-development of the site, but they had a lot of concerns about the lack of provision of parking and the height and design of the apartment block.

“Some small amendments have been made on some sides of the proposed building to hinder balconies overlooking adjoining sites, but ultimately local residents are disappointed that many of their core concerns have not been met.”

The An Bord Pleanála senior executive planners report “recommended that permission be refused, as the development would be visually incongruous and would result in overdevelopment of the site”.

The planning body has given permission for the project to go ahead however, with a number of conditions attached.

“It is considered that … the proposed development would make a positive contribution to the built character of area, would provide an acceptable housing mix, would not seriously the amenities of other properties in the vicinity, and would be acceptable in terms of traffic and pedestrian safety and convenience,” the board put forward in its published statement.

“The proposed development would, therefore, be in accordance with the proper planning and sustainable development of the area.”

A planning application, submitted by Denis McBarron, was lodged last February and was immediately met with concern among local residents, who held a public meeting a month later to discuss the project.

The apartment blocks will be made up of seven studio units, 10 one-bedroom units, and nine two-bedroom units, and would provide accommodation for around 50 people

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