Dan Boyle: Green Party is being taken for granted in FF/FG coalition bid 

Dan Boyle: Green Party is being taken for granted in FF/FG coalition bid 
Green Party's Dan Boyle and Lorna BoguePicture: David Keane.

Green Party Councillor and former Cork South Central TD Dan Boyle has said he feels the Green Party is “being taken for granted” when it comes to Government formation.

It comes as ten key pillars agreed by Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil have been released as part of a document that will be presented to smaller parties in a bid to entice them into Government.

It’s understood that the Green Party is the preferred coalition partner of the two civil war parties, who are still short of numbers required to form a government.

The Greens won 12 seats in February’s general election while the Labour Party and Social Democrats won six each.

Councillor Boyle told The Echo the Green Party would have to have an internal debate once they got a chance to look at any proposals in detail.

“It’s about policies and having them enacted. The process to date has been sadly deficient of talks about what can be done and should be done. 

"The Green Party has to have an internal debate, and that can be only based on having its own mandate respected,” he said.

“It’s very much in a vacuum because of the Covid-19 situation. I think a lot of the discussion about where the Greens are and what the Greens are about has been very misrepresented.

“If anything the Greens are being taken for granted rather than talked to properly like adults,” Councillor Boyle said.

Speaking prior to the presentation of the joint policy document by Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil to the Green Party, Mr Boyle said that while discussions post-election were cordial with the parties, he felt the level of seriousness needed to enact certain policies the Green Party felt strongly about wasn’t there.

“There has to be a lot more delving into the situation and a lot more talking to be done.” 

Asked about red-line issues for the party, he said that a reduction in carbon levels was important, and a change in spending with regards to private and public transport.

“There has to be a change in the way we practice agriculture in this country. We need to physically grow more food and put less attention on live animals,” he added.

“There’s this marginalising of the Green Party. The Green Party places just as much importance on the need to have a proper housing programme in this country, particularly in relation to social housing.

“The Green Party places just as much importance on the need to have a properly resourced health service, that’s public and open to everybody on an equal basis.

“These are important issues to us as well.”

More in this section

Sponsored Content