Motorists raise questions on 'Re-imagining Cork' document

Motorists raise questions on 'Re-imagining Cork' document
Pembroke Street recently pedestrianised as part of the Reimagining Cork City Programme.Picture Clare Keogh

QUESTIONS have been raised by a motorist group over aspects of Cork City Council’s ‘Re-imagining Cork City’ plan that was unveiled last week.

The Cork Motorist Movement welcomed many of the proposals but have said there are still a number of unanswered questions.

Founder Mark Mc Donnell said questions remained regarding “what space the new cycle lanes are going to occupy, if any on street parking will be removed or if any loading bays will be removed to facilitate these.

“There are many people who don’t want to cycle or can’t cycle due to location and these people seem to have been forgotten about,” he added.

Citing the accessibility and connectivity of the city to the suburbs and satellite towns as being of critical importance, Mr Mc Donnell said that train stations in Blackpool and Blarney have been on the table as far back as the late 1990s and added the plans for a Cork Luas have been unveiled several times in recent years.

“Connectivity to the city centre north of the Lee is considerably behind that of the Southside and this plan appears to do nothing to address that imbalance,” Mr Mc Donnell said.

Princes Street recently pedestrianised as part of the Reimagining Cork City Programme.Picture Clare Keogh
Princes Street recently pedestrianised as part of the Reimagining Cork City Programme.Picture Clare Keogh

Mr Mc Donnell also said that moving congestion wasn’t the answer to traffic issues.

“Our fear is that this plan will do nothing to take cars off the road and will only serve to make access to and movement around the city much more difficult,” he said.

“17 years later we still do not have a park and ride in the Northside. The Northside needs public transport access to be prioritised at present after decades of underfunding and neglect,” he added.

Mr Mc Donnell suggested that there were many city centre residents who agreed with him, but were afraid to speak out.

“In the current environment it is increasingly difficult to provide constructive criticism of reduced parking and street access to cars without being accused of being anti-cyclist.

“Issues such as dangerous overtaking and parking in cycle lanes and on footpaths have been conflated with the calls for greater cycling infrastructure.

“We do not want to see a repeat of the attempted land grab on the Wilton Road where people are forced to concede parts of their gardens or on street parking to accommodate a mode of transport that remains a niche and unsuitable for so many people,” Mr Mc Donnell concluded.

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