Calls for Leaving Cert timetable to be published as questions surrounding exams process 'remain unanswered'

Calls for Leaving Cert timetable to be published as questions surrounding exams process 'remain unanswered'

The Department of Education has been called on to urgently provide clarity for students who chose to sit Leaving Cert exams later this year.

Students who chose not to take their predicted grades earlier this month are set to sit exams later this year, after they were cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Cork TD and Sinn Féin spokesperson on Education, Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire, said students need greater clarity as to how exam sessions will take place, particularly in relation to the exams timetable.

“According to the Department of Education, Leaving Certificate resit exams are due to begin in just seven weeks time,” he said.

“I welcome that a start date has been announced.

“However, these exams will be upon students very soon and there are many questions that remain unanswered,” he added.

"The Leaving Certificate class of 2020 have been through a huge amount of stress and anxiety since they left school in March.

“While the Leaving Certificate is difficult in any year, no one could have predicted the Covid-19 pandemic and the cancellation of this year's exams.” 

Mr Ó Laoghaire said many students were left disappointed by their calculated grades, and have chosen to sit the November exams.

"These students deserve the best possible chance to prepare and to do this the Minister for Education must urgently provide them with answers to pressing questions that remain outstanding.

"When will the timetable for the November exams be released?

"Will there be standardisation for the marking of this cohort of students?

"And if so, what will it resemble, given this will obviously be an untypical cohort that is unlikely to fit with the patterns of an ordinary summer Leaving Cert?

"The answers to these questions should be set out now to give students the best possible chance to prepare for exams in November."

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