Minister launches Ireland's first dedicated Quantum Computer Engineering Centre

Minister launches Ireland's first dedicated Quantum Computer Engineering Centre

Tyndall researcher Dr Agnieszka Gocalinska at the launch of Ireland’s first dedicated Quantum Computer Engineering Centre (QCEC) at Tyndall National Institute. Picture: Clare Keogh

MINISTER Simon Harris has launched Ireland’s first dedicated Quantum Computer Engineering Centre (QCEC) at Tyndall National Institute.

The multi-million-euro investment will see an additional 900 sq metres of research space and 45 new jobs dedicated to quantum research at the national institute for ICT research.

The announcement was made at an official launch event, which saw world-leading experts speak to Irish researchers, policymakers and industry leaders on the ‘Quantum Revolution’ and the scale of opportunity for Ireland in this emerging multi-billion-euro market.

We are not on the cusp, but already in the process of the Quantum Revolution. Quantum’s dramatically enhanced computing power will help address the world’s major societal challenges such as food security, energy, and climate change. Areas such as medical research, secure digital communication, crop engineering, manufacturing, astrophysics, economics and weather forecasting, among others, could be revolutionised by utilising this power.

Tyndall has been at the forefront of engineering next generation quantum technology research in Ireland for 10 years and is already working on a number of ambitious projects with industry partners.

Tyndall and Ireland now have an opportunity to play a pivotal part in moving quantum science from theory to engineering and industry, particularly in developing innovative ways to make the technology more powerful, and scalable. 

Especially because we are a country that has an open innovation ecosystem at its heart, most of the major tech companies and ICT innovators are based here, and Tyndall is experienced at bringing new technologies to market.

The new dedicated Quantum Computing Engineering Centre at Tyndall, which is one of Europe’s leading institutes in ‘deep-tech’, will help accelerate the development of quantum research and engineering in Ireland. 

It will upskill Irish researchers in quantum, support open innovation between academia and industry, create high-quality sustainable ICT jobs, and secure Ireland’s future as a worldwide technology leader, whilst supporting key Irish technology companies and SMEs.

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